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Far East Diet Advice

Far East Diet Advice

A new book entitled Japanese Women Don’t Get Old or Fat recently appeared on the market and this startling 3% obesity rate has people wondering: what the heck are the Japanese doing so well to stay healthy and live longer?!?

By now, globalization and broader awareness have helped us get a grasp on the typical Japanese diet. On average, it consists of fish, rice, tea and veggies, a far cry from what the typical American is chomping down on.
 
Rather than go the regular book review route, Charlotte Hilton Andersen at The Huffington Post decided to discuss the Japanese eating habits and lifestyle with three Americans. Three Americans who all lived in Japan and observed firsthand the little nuances and habits that all contribute to better health across the water.
 
Jennie Berglund, one of the interviewees, says, “You never saw someone walking and eating or eating in a car,” because it’s considered  rude. The common foods eaten (above) were repeatedly mentioned, but there’s also a daily fitness habit that complements diet: walking. Despite the prosperous car industry in Japan, many Japanese walk and/or take public transportation to get where they are going out of financial necessity or efficiency (traffic!).
 
Would you consider incorporating a more Japanese diet into your daily food choices for the sake of losing weight?

Posted: 10/14/08
carolineshannon

Forget losing weight -- sushi rocks my world!

LauraLee311

I love sushi. I eat it at least once a week.

VictoriaB

Fish and rice and vegetables sound good to me. My problem is making the effort to buy the good food, cook it and eat it, which is why the cafeteria at work is nice... they do all the work and I get a healthy meal (at least for lunch).