"...the beauty of the model is that they can do well by doing good." -Cory
Read More Testimonials»

On the Diet and Fitness Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Getting in Shape Experts

Paige Waehner

Paige Waehner

Personal trainer and author of About.com's guide to exercise

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Gin Miller

Gin Miller

Creator of step training and a top fitness professional for...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dr. John Spencer Ellis

Dr. John Spencer Ellis

CEO of the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Diet and Fitness Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Avoiding the Workout Dead End

Avoiding the Workout Dead End

Every now and then people hit a roadblock in life. Sometimes the obstruction is a bit more obvious—remember that bumper-to-bumper traffic when you were trying to make it to your anniversary dinner? Other days, the obstacle is a little less visible, like when another lap around the track feels like an impossible feat.

When it comes to a plateau in your workout plan, health expert Jason Ferruggia, author of Muscle-Gaining Secrets, says there are a few tactics to employ when looking to clear a hurdle.

If weight lifting has become ho-hum, Ferruggia says a man should begin to increase his poundage in small amounts. This means taking your typical 25-pound weights to 27 or 28 pounds, rather than raising it a full five pounds.

Another way to bust through a plateau is to learn to take a few deep breaths. For example, if you can only lift 225 pounds for five reps, then crank it out, put the bar down and take deeps breaths for about 30 seconds. Repeat the exercise again, squeezing out as many reps as you can; take a few deep breaths and repeat one more time. The point is that even if you can only squeeze out a few reps each time, the next time you hit the bench you may be able to beat your tally.

Most importantly, Ferruggia says, an exerciser should never repeat the same workout back-to-back.

What are your tips for overcoming a fitness plateau? [Men’s Fitness]

Posted: 6/23/08