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Different Approaches to Ending Drug Addiction

The problem of how to end drug addiction is as old as the human race, with many varied and complex solutions put forward over the years attempting to deal with it. However, this...

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Our Managing High Blood Pressure Experts

Dr. Thomas Moore

Dr. Thomas Moore

Senior author of The DASH Diet for Hypertension

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Dr. Norman Kaplan

Dr. Norman Kaplan

Professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas...

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Dr. Mark Houston

Dr. Mark Houston

Author and director of Hypertension Institute at Saint Thomas...

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Healing High Blood Pressure

When Dennis Richards* was diagnosed with high blood pressure at the age of 45, the Denver-based business consultant admits he was stubborn. “I was resistant to the changes my doctor suggested in my lifestyle,” he says. “I...just wanted a quick way to lower my blood pressure.”

Does this sound like you? If you recently received a high blood pressure diagnosis, also known as hypertension or prehypertension, then you probably thought your doctor would just write you a prescription and all would be well in two weeks. After all, nearly 1/3 of Americans have or will be diagnosed with high blood pressure. The bad news is...it's not that simple.

The good news is that being diagnosed with hypertension doesn’t mean a lifelong sentence of medication and procedures. It’s merely a caution sign on the road of life that says “Hey, buddy, if you don’t make some lifestyle changes quick, you may be headed toward some serious health issues.” If you listen to that wise voice, the first 30 days of treating hypertension can not only make a significant dent in your condition, but maybe ease any fears you have about your health.

What Is Hypertension?

Hypertension occurs when the heart has to work harder to pump blood through your veins, and hypertension generally has no symptoms. If it’s not corrected, it can lead to chronic conditions like hardening of the arteries and heart disease. That’s why lowering your “numbers” is so important. A blood pressure around 120/80 is generally considered to be normal, while a persistent reading of over 140/90 is considered high blood pressure.

Posted: 7/23/08
SarahNRiley

Hypertension is such a sad condition because a lot of it can be prevented by eating right, de-stressing, exercising, and the right sleeping habits. Some people don't think they have the time to exercise, but you can even do it at home with the right system. Link