"I am very taken by Ariane's concept and the philosophy of the website. In any case, I just loved the idea and am glad to chance upon it while reading Oprah." -Marion
Read More Testimonials»

On the Career Blog

Is Your Company Depressed?

Of all the business problems companies have, I think they become more magnified when the chief executive officers lose sight that their organization is made up of people. In my experience...

Read More About Is Your Company Depressed?»

Our Losing Your Job Experts

Richard Nelson Bolles

Richard Nelson Bolles

Renowned author of the What Color Is Your Parachute? Series

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Bradley Richardson

Bradley Richardson

Business author, professional speaker and career development...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Tanya Flynn

Tanya Flynn

Communications manager at Careerbuilder.com

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Career Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Keeping Your Cool

Keeping Your Cool

This morning, most major news organizations are reporting on the grim employment outlook, bouncing off last week's job loss numbers. If you lose your job during these trying times, here are some new strategies to make your exit smoother:

* Keep your cool. Losing your job is no reason to throw a tantrum. Freaking out and throwing the fax machine at your boss isn't the best way to express your feelings about being laid off.
* Pay attention to what your employer is telling you. You'll need to understand why you're being laid off and what kind of severance you're receiving. If you don't listen carefully, you could be missing opportunities to negotiate a better deal.
* Don't beg, it's not pretty. There is little you can do to argue your way back into your job, because it might have been in the elimination stage for a while.
* Don't sign anything right away. You will probably be pressured to sign a severance deal right away, but you don't have to. Take the papers home and have them reviewed by a lawyer. If you've been a stellar employee or you feel you were discriminated against, you may have some leverage to negotiate a better deal.
* Get as many perks as you can. Ask the company to pay for your health insurance for a few months or if they will pay you for unused vacation time. Also, remember to get a recommendation letter before you leave.

Remember to try to find the bright side of your job loss. At least now you're free to find your dream job. [New York Post]

Posted: 4/7/08