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Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

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Our Dealing With Depression Experts

Fawn Fitter

Fawn Fitter

Author of Working in the Dark: Keeping Your Job While Dealing...

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Dr. Andrew Jones

Dr. Andrew Jones

Medical director of the Women’s Health Institute of Texas...

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Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Authority on treating depression, professor of psychiatry...

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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Actress Kirsten Dunst Depressed?

Actress Kirsten Dunst Depressed?

One of the biggest factors to remember when dealing with depression is that you’re not alone. A perfect case in point is 26 year-old actress Kirsten Dunst who has starred in the “Spider-Man” movies and “Marie Antoinette.” After many months of feeling depressed, Dunst finally decided to check herself into the Cirque Lodge Treatment Center in Utah. The facility has also hosted actresses Lindsay Lohan and Eva Mendes.

Rumors of drug and alcohol abuse pushed Dunst into publicizing her depression treatment along with the opportunity to show that the mental illness affects women of all types.

“There's been a lot of misrepresentation about what is going on in my life, and it's been very painful for my friends and family,” she said in an E! Online interview.

What advantages or disadvantages do you think stars have when it comes to dealing with depression and getting depression treatment? [Reuters]

Posted: 5/29/08
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Advantages for stars? They don't have to rely on insurance to be treated. They can go where they want for as long as they want, and can typically afford as much help as they want.