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Dr. Therese Rando

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Boys Don't Cry

Men. Stoic, rock-solid, level-headed-in-a-crisis men. They can handle anything that comes their way, and never show their grief
 
Or so we’ve been led to believe. But just because you’re strong doesn’t mean you shouldn’t find a way to cope with loss. Yes, men and women do grieve differently, but a guy’s still got to cry (or, at least process his feelings.) So how do you do it?
 
A national survey conducted by the University of Kentucky asked how males dealt with the loss of their fathers. It seems that men do grieve, albeit in their own way. Women process their grief by talking and crying while men tend to think and act. The survey finds that most men grieved their fathers' death by taking on their father’s hobbies or engaging in similar active behavior.
 
While it may take men longer to work through the grief process, it is still an effective way of dealing with emotion. [Psychology Today]

Posted: 3/20/08