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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

This One Time, I...

This One Time, I...

Making a good first impression on future employer can be nerve-wracking. Maybe you’ve felt awkward around new business partners or clients. Instead of staring at the sweaty palms in your lap, describe a good vacation story. A good story can go a long way—they help us to find human connections between each other.

Storytelling is an essential business skill. It’s way better than rattling off a long list, and accomplishes the same thing: telling people what you are about and what you like. Your listener is evaluating you as someone they'll potentially do business with, and they're listening for how you respond to challenges. So be careful, you must tell the story well for this to work in your favor.

Keep it short, people! No need to start with the minute you left your house and finish with the moment you arrived back at home. Talk about the most interesting aspect of the trip and something that promotes the true “you.” Ask yourself, why do I want to tell this story? And why should anyone else care? Describe the dedicated “you,” like when you helped your cousin enjoy a cruise of Dominican even though she was seasick. Not the “you” that spent evenings pounding shots at the bar.

Avoid too much information. No one has to (or wants to!) know you were attacked by Montezuma's Revenge while in Mexico. If he or she wants to learn more, they’ll ask. Practice makes perfect, so get your cell's speed dial ready.

What are your feelings about this technique? [MainStreet]

Posted: 5/29/08
enveno1

i hadnt thought of that ...that makes good sence ..thank you..and to everyone have a wonderful day full fo sunshine

  • By enveno1
  • on 5/31/08 8:37 AM EST