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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

My Salary Is...

My Salary Is...

It’s probably the last no-no in the workplace, somewhere near sleeping with your boss and stealing company supplies. Talking about your salary, or asking a colleague about his or her salary, is still considered off-limits and in poor taste in many office settings. But for a growing number of workers in their 20s and 30s, this conversation seems to be happening more often.

Call it a reaction to the 24/7 internet culture or a rebellion against the old ways of doing things, but people are more apt to talk about their income with friends and colleagues than ever before. However, if you’re starting a new job, looking to get promoted or if you're just a little bit curious, you may want to play it cool and follow some guidelines from ABCNews.com:

  • Don’t share your salary information with your coworkers, unless you really want to. It could lead to resentment and infighting down the line.
  • Don’t share your salary with a love interest…unless you’re just about ready to get married.
  • It’s OK to compare salaries with a friend if you’re going for a job opening and you’re not sure if you should negotiate for a better deal.
  • Try not to be thrown by what other people claim to make. Just use it as a gauge.


We want to hear from you. Are you willing to disclose your salary to friends or colleagues? Where would you draw the line? [Abcnews.com]

Posted: 5/5/08