"I have so enjoyed your book! It is easy to digest and very down to earth and so relative to us all. And the 30 day change emails are so helpful and upbeat." -Stephanie
Read More Testimonials»

On the Family Blog

Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

Read More About Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care»

Our Being Pregnant Experts

Robin Elise Weiss

Robin Elise Weiss

Author of several pregnancy books and mother of seven

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Kip Kozlowski

Kip Kozlowski

Certified nurse-midwife and founder of the Greenhouse Birth...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Ann Douglas

Ann Douglas

Author of 28 books on pregnancy and motherhood

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Family Experts»


The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Something's Fishy

Something's Fishy

During my first prenatal visit with my obstetrician, she went over a list of foods I should stay away from during my pregnancy, which included certain deli meats, soft cheeses, raw fish (goodbye beloved sushi), and a number of cooked fish that are high in mercury.

Mercury is a neurotoxin especially dangerous to newborns and infants, which is why pregnant women are told to avoid them during those nine months (some fish high in mercury include shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish.) So I was a bit surprised by a recent Washington Post story on how the FDA is backtracking on its prior recommendations and will soon
encourage expectant moms to start eating all types of fish.

In fact, the organization has reportedly been circulating a draft report within the government that argues the health benefits of eating fish outweigh the potential ill effects of mercury.

Some environmental agencies—along with certain members of Congress—are crying foul, saying that the FDA doesn’t have enough scientific evidence to back up its new claim, and the research they do have is “scientifically flawed.”

I don’t know about you, but I have had it with the FDA. Between their flip-flopping on BPA in baby bottles and their failure to disclose traces of melamine in certain US baby formulas (they only did so after the Associated Press requested the info for a story), it seems the organization really doesn’t care about the health of our nation’s kids. As parents, we rely on groups like the FDA to help us keep our children safe. If we can’t trust them, then where do we turn? What do you think about the FDA’s possible new stance on mercury? Sound off below.

Posted: 12/22/08

While you should talk to your doctor about what you can and can't eat, I think it's important to ask your mom and other mothers about their diet. I appreciate agencies such as the FDA trying to look out for us, but I also think the diet restrictions are a little overboard today. (I mean really, no lunch meat?)


I think it's best to do whatever research you can on your own, or ask the people around you for advice. In the end, you have to go with your gut and make a decision based on what you find.

  • By aliciak
  • on 12/26/08 11:26 AM EST

I don't think you can trust the FDA. Just think of how many poisonings/contaminations have occurred in the past few years. Ecoli in spinach and peanut butter? Tainted dog food? Numerous beef/meat recalls? If I were pregnant, I would stay stay far away from fish for those 9 months.


I read something about the current administration being able to overturn certain regulations in the final days in office. Things like relaxing emissions standards. I bet this mercury change is related to that same effort.