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Zap That Migraine Away

Zap That Migraine Away

The warning signs are all too familiar: You start to have trouble seeing, you get little sqiggly lines in your vision and WHAP! You've got a killer migrane, and any source of light that hits your eyes makes you want to start punching someone or cry.

If you’re one of millions of Americans who struggles with a migraine health diagnosis on a regular basis, get ready for some interesting news. Researchers have discovered some new technology-based treatments that could help treat migraines.

The first treatment plan, which is aimed at lower level migraines and headaches, uses a hairdryer-like device that shoots magnetic impulses through the back of your head. In a study on the effectiveness of this treatment, about 39% of the participants were pain-free compared to 22% in the control group.

The other option, well, reminds us of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest just a little too much. It involves implanting a nerostimulator in the back of your head that sends electrical "pulses" through your central nervous system to stop the pain. About 40% of people say this works.

Are your migraines so bad that you'd consider a modified version of electro-shock treatment? [HealthDay]

Posted: 7/3/08