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Summer Foot Care: Fact or Fiction?

Summer Foot Care: Fact or Fiction?

Come summertime, don't you love to kick off your shoes and stroll along the beach while the waves lap and roll over your feet? The spring and softness of cool, fresh grass between your toes in a park can feel better than some carpets. But is going barefoot healthy for your feet? The answer is no, because it leaves you vulnerable to cuts, scrapes, punctures and/or nail injuries. Test your tootsie knowledge with our footcare quiz:

ASSUMPTION: Flats and flip-flops are good for your feet.
TRUE OR FALSE: False.
This is a tricky one. Most women assume flats and flip-flops are good for your feet because heels are so heinous for them. However, flats and flip-flop sandals lack proper support for your foot and can lead to a health diagnosis of plantar fasciitis (heel pain), ankle sprains and tendonitis. Flat shoes and flip-flop sandals are fine to wear for a few hours but are not recommend for all-day use.

ASSUMPTION: Over-the-counter products to remove corns are not safe or effective.
TRUE OR FALSE: True.
Did that one get you? It turns out that most at-home scrubs for corns just exfoliate the corn, they don’t actually remove it. A health diagnosis of a corn means that you have a buildup of skin with a hard center. The skin buildup occurs from toe knuckles rubbing against an ill-fitting shoe. To really get rid of a corn, wear shoes that fit properly with a wider toe area.

ASSUMPTION: You don’t need to put sunscreen on your feet.
TRUE OR FALSE: False.
With all the promotion of sunscreens and warnings against skin cancer, hopefully you got that one right. Any part of your body that is exposed to the sun needs sunscreen. Make sure your suntan lotion has an SPF of 15 or higher.  

ASSUMPTION: For healthy toenails, trim them straight across.
TRUE OR FALSE: False.
Cutting your toenails straight across or cutting toenails too short can lead to ingrown toenails, which is dangerous for those with a diabetes health diagnosis. If left untreated, ingrown toenails can lead to infection or require surgery. For healthy toenails, leave the nail a little longer and cut along the natural curve of your toe.

So how did you do? We have more feet treats to share another time, so you have another chance to test your foot care knowledge. Did you learn anything new from this one? [HealthDay]

Posted: 6/23/08