"Je trouve votre site absolument superbe!" -Kathya
Read More Testimonials»

On the Health Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Your Health Diagnosis Experts

Lee Thomas

Lee Thomas

Journalist, television broadcaster and author of Turning White...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Julie Hryniewicz-Hache

Julie Hryniewicz-Hache

Keynote speaker, life consultant, seminar leader and author...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Patrick Mathieu

Patrick Mathieu

Author of What’s Your Expiry Date?: Embrace Your Mortality...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Health Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Going to a Spa, or Chemo?

Going to a Spa, or Chemo?

Close your eyes and imagine this...

Instead of walking into an intimidating hospital, gliding along stark white hallways with faulty florescent lights to get to your chemotherapy treatment, your treatment is administered in a spa-like building, with relaxing music, running waterfalls, nature sounds and even a large window with a view of the ocean. Do you think your body would respond better to treatment?

That's the theory put forth by advocates of evidenced-based design, a theory of interior design that argues that one's surroundings can affect the healing response and overall well-being. For patients dealing with a health diagnosis, this design difference could literally mean the difference between life and death.

Much anecdotal evidence has supported evidence-based design; patients are quick to say how comfortable and relaxing a room can make them feel. However, no large-scale clinical studies support the concept. In fact, some critics outright oppose the idea of evidence-based design because they argue it’s not a responsible way to spend healthcare money. Their argument is that in a country with spiraling healthcare costs, it might be wiser to use those funds for technology or equipment upgrades rather than pools and lush gardens.

We'd like to hear from you. If you're dealing with cancer, or any major health diagnosis, do you think you could recover better in relaxing, spacious rooms with waterfalls and other soothing elements, or would you prefer a traditional Western medical approach in a hospital? Is the money better spent this way or on newer technologies? [The Wall Street Journal]

Posted: 8/21/08
LMAYO9

I think doctors need to pay more attention to things like one's environment, diet, stress level, etc. to promote healing. The body needs to respond to treatments to battle things like cancer, so how does one expect a stressed out, nervous body to respond adequately? I am all for this idea, to the point that I wish even going to the doctor was a more relaxing and less clinical experience. It might get people more excited to go to the doctor and take care of their health.

  • By LMAYO9
  • on 8/22/08 9:46 AM EST