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It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

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Cancer Diagnosis Support

Whether you’ve just received a cancer diagnosis or another difficult health diagnosis, you’re probably going to encounter friends and loved ones who don’t know how to act or talk around you. Unfortunately, this is a normal part of the process. They probably won’t know how to approach you and are likely to say some inappropriate things.
 
This morning’s Wall Street Journal article provides advice for people who are helping a loved one through a health diagnosis, but the same advice can be used for patients. Try to be patient with your friends and family and expect these inappropriate comments to slip out when you least expect it. If necessary, talk to your loved one and explain the situation from your perspective so that they can take your lead. Also, do your best to change the subject when you’re tired of talking about your illness and don’t be afraid to make specific requests of your loved ones when you need help. Often getting them involved will make them feel less awkward. And of course, just being there always helps.
 
And once you go through this experience yourself, you’ll be better able to support a friend in the same situation. [Wall Street Journal]

Posted: 4/1/08