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Up and Coming IOS Game Apps

If you are looking for some time to kill with some wickedly fun games, look no further than the iTunes App Store. Here is a glance into the top 10 games in the app store and what...

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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Privacy Settings Peek-a-Boo

With the announcement of Facebook’s new privacy controls a week ago, users were encouraged to “customize” like crazy. The changes, allowing you to alter who could and could not view each and every aspect of your profile, called out for attention from rambunctious students and wanna-be wild adults who wish they were still in school. Hide those comments and photos you don’t want anyone (but your dearest, closest friends who happen to be in multiple networks) to see!

However, not all your secrets are safe. A Canadian computer technician named Byron Ng was able to view photos that users thought were protected from viewing under privacy settings. His passageway into the lives of Facebook users allowed him to see private pics belonging to Paris Hilton and even Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg. The company was notified of the problem on Monday and apparently put an end to this sneaky situation later that afternoon.

If one computer whiz was genius enough to override the system, could it be done again? [MSNBC]

Posted: 3/26/08