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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Thud!

Thud!

Here we go. Let’s poke a little fun at the current economic mess we’re in. (Not much—just a little OK?—while hoping for better days ahead.)

We like this investment editorial, because it acknowledges that government experts are stymied. (We love that word. It reminds us of The Little Rascals.) And there’s that term, “toxic-paper,” too: Useful it is. So everyone’s stumped. Sooner or later someone will figure out the mess if s/he’s an expert in “market structure and theory.”

It sounds like we need someone who can see all the way down to the bottom of the mess. Anyone out there with x-ray vision?

Posted: 2/18/09
lilliede81

My parents went through the depression. They married in their late 30's (which was late in the 1930's.) They wasted nothing and recycled everything including string, rubber bands, gift wrap and ribbon. They were frugal for the rest of their lives and taught me how to conserve, too. My dad drove his 1939 Pontiac almost to the end of the 1950's. They repaired & recycled everything, clothes, sox, irons, toasters, dishpans, lawn watering hoses, so they could continue to use these items, and avoid having to buy replacements. They really knew how to stretch their money. It just takes creative iminagation and a little effort!

dawnbell

Generations before us got thru it...we will too. I remember my grandparents talking about the depression all the time. My grandmother wasted nothing. We've become such a throwaway society perhaps we need to get back to our roots.