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Work's Too Good to Leave Behind

Work's Too Good to Leave Behind

It's harder to stay retired than you thought it would be. In a society prone to workaholics, many people's lives simply revolve around their jobs. When they retire, there is a hole that is much harder to fill than they anticipated. This is especially true if your job was part of your life's passion.

It's no secret that having a job does have psychological benefits—structure, a sense of accomplishment and a way to get out of the house (and earn money instead of spending it!). Some people may add getting away from their spouses to that list as well. It's pretty tough going from spending 12 hours a day with someone—with five to eight of those asleep—to spending your every waking moment together. Sometimes you just have to get away.

The need for social outlet aside, many boomers are struggling to find their purpose in retirement. Some of them are staying in the workforce, not because they need to for financial reasons, but simply because they want to for physical and mental fitness.

What about you? Do you think retirement will be something you easily adjust to, or like many of the boomers, do you expect it to be a struggle? [MSNBC]

Posted: 6/16/08