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3 Ways Families Are Like Conveyor Belts

Conveyor belts are a great asset to businesses, whether they're used in warehouses, assembly lines, or other applications. In the same way, families are a great asset when each...

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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

What's in a Name?

The banks have been notified, the new business cards made, and the his and hers towels monogrammed. When you're planning a wedding, taking a spouse's last name might not be the highest on the priority list but it involves breaking the news to a lot of people—and you can bet the process takes even longer when it's the groom filling out the change forms.

That's right: Unless you live in Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Massachusetts, New York or North Dakota, your husband may have to put up a fight if he wants to adopt your name. Just ask Michael Bijon (nee Buday), whose two-year legal battle with the state of California ended yesterday when he finally picked up his drivers license featuring his married moniker. Bijon—who cited feeling closer to his wife's father as part of the reasoning behind the change—ponied up more than $300 in court fees, which is more than triple the amount that his wife, Diana, would be expected to pay to take his surname. In addition, Bijon had to advertise his plans in newspapers for a month and get approval from a judge. Talk about committed!

While Bijon's ACLU-backed lawsuit inspired policy changes in the Golden State, we're still left wondering about the double standard. Would you be comfortable with your fiancé taking your name? Do you think he would want to? Why or why not? [Reuters]

Posted: 5/7/08