"First30Days.com is incredible! It is an endless source of reinforcement to me. You have become my Oprah of the Internet!" -Elizabeth
Read More Testimonials»

On the New Directions Blog

Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

Read More About Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care»

Our Moving to a New City Experts

Jamie Allen

Jamie Allen

Headhunter of Hundreds of Heads guides and author of How to...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Susan Miller

Susan Miller

President and founder of JUSTMOVED! N.E.W. Ministries and...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Cathy Goodwin, Ph.D.

Cathy Goodwin, Ph.D.

Career planner and creative life transition expert

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our New Directions Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Won't You Be My Neighbor?

With all the stresses that accompany moving to a new city, it’s easy to forget that the work isn’t over once you settle into your new home. You may know some folks in your new city already, but chances are, you won’t know any of your neighbors. How do you play the getting-to-know-you game as a full-fledged adult?

Well, perhaps predictably, the first step is to approach people. But remember to be observant and aware: if you see a neighbor fumbling with car keys and yelling at their toddler, that would probably not be the best time to introduce yourself. At some point, it’ll happen however, so be ready with an “I’m so-and-so and I just moved in.” Keep the conversation on a neutral topic like your new city, and inquire about its’ restaurants or businesses, or about the neighborhood.

Once you’ve broken the ice with a few neighbors, think about throwing a party or getting involved in community activities. In other words, be social! Find the local coffee shop, join a book club, or look into volunteer opportunities in the area. Once you feel part of the immediate neighborhood, it will get easier to feel part of the city in its entirety. [Soyouwanna.com]

Posted: 5/16/08