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Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

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Our Managing Prostate Cancer Experts

Dr. Jonathan W. Simons

Dr. Jonathan W. Simons

Physician, CEO and President of the Prostate Cancer Foundation...

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Dr. Louis Potters

Dr. Louis Potters

Leader in the field of radiation oncology

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Dr. Richard D. Williams

Dr. Richard D. Williams

Head of the Department of Urology at the University of Iowa

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Conquering Prostate Cancer

During your first 30 days after a diagnosis of prostate cancer you may feel vulnerable and frightened, and for good reason. You may have heard that prostate cancer is the second-most common cause of cancer death among men after lung cancer. However, deaths have declined by 30% in the last few years due largely to the fact that more prostate cancer treatment options are available.

Either a routine screening (advisable for men in their forties and older) or a doctor’s visit for symptoms of prostate cancer alerted you to your condition. Your PSA–a measure of your body’s response to prostate cancer cells–is probably high, which prompted concern in the first place. You’ve likely had a biopsy and have been given a Gleason grade, which identifies how advanced the condition is.

So now what? Like most men, you want the most aggressive treatment. “Cut it out!” you say. “Let’s squash this…I’ve got a life to get back to!” We hear you. But step back for a second. Surgery isn’t always the best option. In the days and weeks after a prostate cancer diagnosis, the most important things to do are figure out how aggressive your cancer is, work with your doctor on a treatment plan, get the support you need and learn all you can about your condition.

By slowing down and understanding your specific situation, you can treat, survive and thrive.

Posted: 9/5/08