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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Katie Danziger

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Gerald Levin

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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Act Deliberately

Act Deliberately

When it comes to important decisions regarding making a change in your life, it’s not always easy to know how to go about doing so. Are quick, impulsive judgments better because they don’t allow for over-thinking and stalling? Should we trust our intuition? On the other hand, what about taking some time “to sleep on it” and seeing where your thoughts are in the morning? Or is that a little too passive?
 
The answer is neither, according to a recent study. Research points to “good old-fashioned conscious thought” as being the best way to tackle those “life-changing decisions.” Findings published in a 2006 issue of Science previously concluded that both snap decisions and the sleep-on-it kind were better, but new research in the upcoming Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology says that both of these lead to inadequate decision-making. Being able to fully process something is key to making solid life choices.
 
If you are facing a particular change in your life, it’s worth thinking things through as opposed to making quick decisions. How do you come to conclusions regarding making change easier? Do you make a plan? [Live Science]

Posted: 8/14/08