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21 Questions

21 Questions

The questions being asked during an interview can be mind boggling, and if you’ve recently been laid off, you’ll want to make sure you know the proper way to answer if you want to land that new job.

To help, the New York Post offers up some great tips to help you concoct the right answers during an interview. They offer advice on how to answer questions such as, “Why are you leaving your current job?” “Where do you see yourself in two (or three or five) years?” and much more.

Apparently, the trick to giving the “right” answer is to know what the interviewer is actually asking. For example, with the infamous question of “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” the interviewer is not looking for you to go off on a tangent of all your successes, for that might make you look arrogant. Make sure your strengths pertain to the job you are interviewing for. As for your weaknesses, masking your strengths as weaknesses is not a wise idea. The interviewer doesn’t need to know that your weaknesses are that you work too hard or that you care too much—fool, this only makes you look like a liar (No one’s perfect!) Instead, make your weaknesses something minimal like how you are working on your Mac skills.

Tell us the hardest question you've ever had to answer during an interview. How did you handle it?

 

Posted: 6/23/08