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Learning Compassion

Learning Compassion

In a Huffington Post article with the funny title, “Chill Out: Compassion The Dalai Lama Way,” Ed Shapiro tells the story of meeting the well-known spiritual leader while on his honeymoon in India. Shapiro echoes what many have said before about such an encounter, that in meeting the Dalai Lama, he came face to face with the epitome of compassion.
Compassion should be part of living more spiritually, but it can be difficult to define and even more difficult to achieve. Shapiro describes a compassionate person as “someone who was so ordinary, so simple and his feelings for others so genuine.” In the words of the Dalai Lama, “My religion is kindness.”
He makes it sound so easy! Can you think of examples of compassion from your own life, whether it was showing kindness towards someone going through a tough situation or you on the receiving end of that kindness?

Posted: 9/18/08

I work in the healthcare field and I see first hand compassion on a daily basis. These older ladies and gents just want to get the care they need and the respect they deserve. Most are wheelchair bound and unable to attend to their smallest needs. Some never see a visitor. There caregivers are substitute daughters, sons, neices and nephews to them. Most do there best to make them feel cared for, mind, body and soul.

  • By arabrab
  • on 10/21/08 7:06 AM EST

compassion is when my sick dog helps me up the stairs when my back hurts so terribly. He had cancer and was dying. He was my best friend in the world. Last night I put him down. I am so sad but so thankful for the years we had together. He saved my daughter from terrible emotional problems after her first golden died who was 13. He gave us endless love, laughter and the best years of his life.


I agree with Alicia, compassion is found in the little gifts we give and receive. A hug, a quick note to say hi, a smile. All these little touches add up to big actions that are embraced with gratitude and appreciation. They all tie in together.


It's all about those little moments, when a stranger does something small for you for no reason. It can be as simple as making conversation with someone, reaching out.

  • By aliciak
  • on 9/18/08 1:08 PM EST

I have tremendous respect and gratitude for nurses. I will never forget the kindness and compassion shown to me by nurses and healthcare aides... people just passing through my life who took the time to make me comfortable, relieve my pain or just give some encouragement. It only takes a moment to be kind ...