"Ariane, I love your blog and believe you are a true pioneer in this concept of change." -carlabeau
Read More Testimonials»

On the Diet and Fitness Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Living Healthier Experts

Bob Livingstone

Bob Livingstone

LCSW and psychotherapist in private practice for almost twenty...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dean Ornish

Dean Ornish

Professor of medicine and best-selling author

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Bob Harper

Bob Harper

Fitness trainer on NBC's hit show The Biggest Loser

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Diet and Fitness Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Soiled Soil

Soiled Soil

Those leafy greens and crunchy carrots from your garden may contain more than their fair share of healthy vitamins and minerals. A growing concern among environmentalists and avid gardeners is the potential for high levels of lead to be present in urban and suburban soil. According to the Boston Globe, The University of Massachusetts at Amherst's Soil and Plant Tissue Testing Lab takes in up to 16,000 soil samples a year from concerned gardeners and finds that on average 10% of them contain unhealthy levels of lead. Children exposed to lead can potentially develop learning disabilities and behavioral problems and adults can experience high blood pressure and reproductive problems. Experts say the best thing you can do for healthy living and gardening is to get informed.

"We don't want to discourage people from gardening," Wendy Heiger-Bernays, an environmental health professor, told the Boston Globe. "We want people to garden safely and have a harvest to reap the benefits of nutrition, social and health from working in the garden."

In addition to having your soil checked for contamination, there are several things you can do to ensure you and your garden stay healthy. In general, the soil within six feet of a building usually contains the highest concentration of lead due to fallen paint chips, so you should plant away from the house and/or in raised beds with fresh soil. Also fruit crops like tomatoes, squash, peas, and corn tend to absorb very low levels of lead.

What’s in your garden? Is this the first you've heard of soiled soil? If not, where do you send your soil to get checked? [Boston Globe]

Posted: 8/13/08
ROBIN3161

robin 3161
we really do need to take better care of our world.