"Thank you for the daily encouragements. Reading and following the daily suggestions gives me a different outlook on my life." -Chris
Read More Testimonials»

On the Diet and Fitness Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Living Healthier Experts

Bob Livingstone

Bob Livingstone

LCSW and psychotherapist in private practice for almost twenty...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dean Ornish

Dean Ornish

Professor of medicine and best-selling author

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Bob Harper

Bob Harper

Fitness trainer on NBC's hit show The Biggest Loser

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Diet and Fitness Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Become the Morning Person of Your Dreams

Become the Morning Person of Your Dreams

Most people have experienced waking up “on the wrong side of the bed.” But for some early-morning rising is downright painful.
 
And if you have been living the night owl lifestyle—that is, stay up late and rise when the mood strikes—doctors have news for you: Adults need seven to eight hours of sleep each night, and a continual lack of sleep can lead to several health risks, including obesity and depression.
 
But you’re in luck because experts say there is a way to change your morning rhythm and make rolling out of bed a bit easier, so living healthy can be more than just a (late-night) dream. Follow the next few steps, and you will be rising and shining in no time.
 
*Get on schedule. Learn to get up and go to bed around the same time each day. This means weekends, too! Your body appreciates a regular sleep pattern.
 
*Leave the curtains open. Waking up to a bit of sunshine may seem like a blinding idea, but light is your body’s internal alarm clock.
 
*Keep entertainment out of the bedroom.
This means no falling asleep to the television or reading in bed. Your bed is for sleeping and intimate time.
 
*Limit your pre-bed food consumption. A small snack may be in order, but avoid large meals. What’s more, alcohol may initially help you fall asleep, but once it wears off it will only disrupt getting some decent shut-eye.
 
*Don’t exercise before bed and avoid caffeine. Both work to rev-up the body as opposed to helping you sleep.
 
If all else fails, everyone needs a little help sometimes. Talk to a sleep specialist if you cannot get a decent wink of slumber. You may have a serious sleep disorder or other health condition that only a medical expert can diagnose. [Newsweek]

Posted: 6/19/08