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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Dr. Therese Rando

Dr. Therese Rando

Psychologist, grief specialist and author of How to Go on...

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David Kessler

Journalist, author and motivational speaker

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Helen Fitzgerald

Helen Fitzgerald

Certified death educator, author and lecturer

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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

The "Whys" of Grief

“Why?” It’s a question that is hard enough for an adult to answer, let alone a child, but no matter their age, kids will always question death and loss. Our job, in the midst of grieving is to try and understand their feelings even as we sort through our own.

The way a child reacts to death is largely dependent on their age. Whatever your beliefs, make sure your response is one the child can understand. Speak in honest language so that your child understands that the person who is gone is not coming back. Most experts recommend that you not equate death with sleep, as it can imply the person could wake up—and also may make small children frightened of going to bed.

Funerals can be a good opportunity for kids to gain closure after a death, just as they are for adults. Make sure your child knows what to expect, and if they are older, give them a choice about attending, and respect their wishes if they decline.

By being open about death and your own grief, you can help a child understand the process and move through it together. Do you have any tips for explaining death to children? [CNN]

 

Posted: 4/24/08