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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Ron Dembo

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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Voting for the Planet

Voting for the Planet

It's fun to watch the back and forth between the candidates running for President in this election cycle, but can you pinpoint where any of them stand on going green and saving the environment? You probably can't, because in a survey of the questions posed to the candidates by The League of Conservation Voters, only eight out of more than 3,000 were about the environment.

Whoever wins the election will have the monumental task of defining a new environmental initiative for the country and for the world, so you might want to do some reading. To start, Newsweek's cover story this week is on this very issue, and it examines the voting record and positions for Sen. John McCain, Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama. Though Sen. McCain believes in changing emission standards, which is quite different from the rest of the Republican party, his voting record in the Senate doesn't support that claim. As for the Democrats in the race, their plans are so similar to each other that the League has not endorsed either one.

Take some time today to look up each candidate's positions on climate change. Think about which one best suits your feelings on the subject and who you would vote for in November (of course, depending on who wins the Democratic nomination). Then, make sure you're registered to vote and mark November 4th on your calendar as the day you cast your ballot to help change the course of global warming. [Newsweek]

Posted: 4/7/08