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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Commitment Clutter

Commitment Clutter

Unclutterer interviews “organizing legend” Julie Morgenstern, the author of When Organizing Isn’t Enough: SHED Your Stuff, Change Your Life, about the different kinds of clutter. It’s pretty easy to identify that a basement full of junk, a closet full of old clothes you’ll never wear or a storage space of “extra” furniture may be in need of some decluttering, but what about the more abstract kind of clutter?
 
Like...commitment problems! Well, we're not talking about the proverbial fear of commitment. Quite the opposite actually: we are overcommitted! Morgenstern defines “commitment clutter” as “unfinished projects and to-dos, unfulfilled obligations, and cumbersome roles which bog you down, make you feel bad about yourself, de-energize and deplete you.” If you find yourself with practically every “time-slot” of the day filled with something, whether it’s a social engagement or something around the house, it may be time to declutter.
 
Some projects and obligations are necessary—doing the dishes, taking the kids to soccer practice—but take a moment to go day by day, hour by hour, and think about the commitments that are cumbersome or de-energizing. What do you really not like to do? Does anything come to mind? Are some of your commitments dragging you down? Make a plan to shed a few and see how you feel.

Posted: 8/12/08
aliciak

Yes, schizet, I find myself in the same predicament constantly! It's easy to decline doing things if you're not feeling well or it conflicts with something else, but so hard to say no when you just don't feel like it. I'm learning that curling up with a book or going to bed early is the "right" choice sometimes.

  • By aliciak
  • on 8/20/08 8:51 AM EST
schiznet

I find this to be helpful in the fact that it brings to light my near-inability to say "no" even when I should.
Very helpful!!