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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Peter Walsh

Peter Walsh

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Meryl Starr

Organizing expert, author and personal consultant

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Car Trouble

Car Trouble

It’s easy to overlook your vehicle when planning out organization and cleaning projects. It’s just a mode of transportation—no one has to live in it! But what if it looks like someone does live in it? Not good! Chauffeuring the kids to and fro in a messy car is not exactly encouraging for the next time you, say, ask them to clean their rooms. A disorganized car will also negatively color your commute or road trip, so why not spiff it up?

Unclutterer is here to rescue you! Before tackling many organization projects, ask yourself the proverbial “in an ideal world” question: what would your car look like on the inside if you could have your way? How should you stow away emergency necessities, snacks, maps, etc.? What doesn’t belong there at all?

Unclutterer suggests dividing up the car into zones of attack to make getting organized more manageable. It’s easy to forget those places that hide mess—glove compartment and trunk—but these “junk drawers” need tending to as well. How do you tackle car clutter?

Posted: 7/28/08
Only37Constant

One thing nobody told me in college is that, when you work in a small place, and park in the employee parking lot, at least one of your bosses is (I consider) nosy enough to check out what's in the back of your car and comment to you on it in front of an entire front office and waiting room full of patients. In a small town, so do all your neighbors. When the bosses use my vehicle to run all their errands and pick up their stuff (like several 12-packs of soda for the break room fridge), I have people thinking and commenting that it's all for me. (Or if I bought a pizza the night before, and the dr. sends me downtown for a pizza for him the night after). At home I can close my curtains/blinds to prying eyes; not so in the car. Everyone peers into someone's car and makes the contents their own business. (My kindly elderly neighbor in a larger city also told me that, when I parked on the street, instead of my off-street parking, gangs of teenage and older guys would peer into the windows and hatchback of my old car to check out whether it contained anything they considered worth stealing). Just FYI.