"Your book has fabulous tips to help the mindset-changing work that I do in the health industry. I am already sharing the book and web site with clients." -Tatiana
Read More Testimonials»

On the Diet and Fitness Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Getting in Shape Experts

Paige Waehner

Paige Waehner

Personal trainer and author of About.com's guide to exercise

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Gin Miller

Gin Miller

Creator of step training and a top fitness professional for...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dr. John Spencer Ellis

Dr. John Spencer Ellis

CEO of the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Diet and Fitness Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Mind Over Matter

Mind Over Matter

Surely you’ve experienced the proverbial butterflies before leading a meeting, giving a talk or performing in front of an audience. You’ve probably had stomach flops as a result of thinking about a new love. Maybe your heart rate was sky-high as you waited to hear test results at the doctor’s. It’s not at all a New Agey thing to say that mind and body are very much connected, and this fact could be affecting your workout routine, for better or worse.
 
In an MSNBC.com article, Gareth Dutton, a psychologist in Florida, reminds us that “a thought is just a thought. It doesn’t mean it’s reality.” So, you hate exercising! In actuality, there are probably specific things about exercising you don’t like, but if you think more about it, there are fun aspects, too. Need help getting out of the negative-thought rut? The article lists some typical utterances such as “There’s no way I can find the time to exercise” and “I’ll never be able to lose all this weight,” and offers up “better thoughts” for turning that negativity around.
 
When you’re formulating a plan for getting in shape, what thoughts run through your mind? Are you excited at the new challenge and looking forward to the results? Or are you beleaguered by doubts and fears, presuming that you are going to fail? Maybe a combination of both?

Posted: 11/13/08
LauraLee311

When I don’t feel like working out, I just remind myself of how much better I always feel when I’m finished.