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The Heavy Burden of Depression

The Heavy Burden of Depression

In “Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me,” the terribly named character, Fat Bastard, gave viewers a glimpse into the possible reasons why he might be so...rotund. “I can't stop eating. I eat because I'm unhappy, and I'm unhappy because I eat. It's a vicious cycle,” he says.

Of course, we only get that tiny glimpse into Fat Bastard's character before he passes gas and threatens to kill Austin, but the confession reflects an understandable connection. No scientific evidence existed to support the depression/obesity cycle—until now.

Researchers found that obese people may be more likely to experience depression because they are unsatisfied with how they look. At the same time, people dealing with depression can develop the mentality of “why bother?” that leads them eat unhealthy foods and remain inactive. The less depressed people care about their eating and exercise habits, the more likely they are to gain weight. The weight gain makes them feel worse, which can cause them to eat more.

Fortunately, exercise and stress reduction techniques have proven to be successful in helping alleviate depression and weight gain.

How do you prevent yourself from overeating when you’re dealing with depression? [Science Daily]

Posted: 6/3/08