"Congratulations on the web site and your life's work... you have a wonderful way about you and, obviously, make a huge difference in the lives of others." -Mike
Read More Testimonials»

On the Health Blog

Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

Read More About Work Your Body, Work Your Mind»

Our Dealing With Depression Experts

Fawn Fitter

Fawn Fitter

Author of Working in the Dark: Keeping Your Job While Dealing...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dr. Andrew Jones

Dr. Andrew Jones

Medical director of the Women’s Health Institute of Texas...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Authority on treating depression, professor of psychiatry...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Health Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Depression in the Ranks

The troops we send off to the battlefield are suffering intense mental distress. A new report done by the Rand Corporation, a non-profit group devoted to improving policy, shows that one in five U.S. troops is suffering from serious depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. What’s worse is that these troops are not getting the mental health care they need to get well—only about half of the troops sought help.
 
The mental and emotional toll of being in a war zone for an extended period of time is to blame for these conditions, and unfortunately in the armed forces there is a big stigma associated with mental health issues. If you’re depressed, you’re viewed as not being “tough enough” for the task at hand, and a soldier can lose the trust of his or her colleagues if the word gets out. This leads many troops to keep quiet about their suffering.
 
Though it will take time for these troops to get home and get the help they need, it starts with eliminating the stigma associated with depression. No one should be ashamed for feeling depressed, and speaking up to get help is the first step toward healing. [Los Angeles Times]

Posted: 4/18/08