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Work Your Body, Work Your Mind

It took me a long time to admit that I wasn’t successfully coping with my depression and anxiety on my own. It took even longer to come up with a plan to fight back against my own...

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Our Dealing With Depression Experts

Fawn Fitter

Fawn Fitter

Author of Working in the Dark: Keeping Your Job While Dealing...

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Dr. Andrew Jones

Dr. Andrew Jones

Medical director of the Women’s Health Institute of Texas...

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Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Dr. Jesse H. Wright

Authority on treating depression, professor of psychiatry...

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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Are You Depressed or Sick?

If you’re dealing with depression, how long did it take you to find a treatment that worked? Are you on any medications? How sure are you that it’s the right medication for you?

A recent study showed that 10% of patients diagnosed with mental illness are suffering from an underlying physical condition, such as a heart murmur or mineral deficiency, that might be mimicking depression. A calcium or magnesium deficiency can cause depression-like symptoms. So can a thyroid disorder.

In another study, more than 40% of patients that were diagnosed with depression were found to be taking medications that cause depression as a side effect. For example, many asthma medications can cause depression as a side effect.

Then there’s the issue of being prescribed the wrong medication that can worsen some medical health conditions. One scientist shared her experience of being prescribed tranquillizers when she was diagnosed with terminal cancer to help her overcome the shock and anxiety of such a severe health diagnosis. She beat the cancer but became addicted to her medication. When she tried to go off the tranquillizers and try an antidepressant, she became suicidal. When her husband admitted her to the hospital, the doctors discovered the suicidal thoughts and behavior were associated with the tranquillizer withdrawal.

Are doctors too quick to offer patients antidepressants? What’s a good approach to ensuring people who are dealing with depression receive the right medication? [The Daily Mail]

Posted: 6/10/08