Archive for June, 2013

26 jun

Corporate Dating Rule #1: This Is an Engagement, Not a Marriage

Kerrigan2So, you thought this would be about love in the workplace? Not really, except that the happy-ever-after in your career depends only on one relationship: the one you have with yourself.

I recently spoke with a college graduate who is beginning her job search. She wants to get a job in a prime-time newsroom because she hates change and thinks “newsrooms keep staff for years.”

What surprised me most is that anyone—especially a Gen Y—thinks they can marry a company anymore. Date? Yes. Be engaged for a while? Yes. Marry? No.

Let’s face it—today’s business world is fickle. Just think of your smart phone—the minute you fall in love with it, it’s altered completely or off the market. That’s how fast things change.

And that’s not a bad thing. Dating keeps you sharp and on your toes. There’s no time to get complacent or bored. And, it helps you become more grounded in your own abilities to adapt. And that’s the name of the game.

Make a commitment to yourself first and foremost. Develop your skills, stay current and connected, and bring your best to every company you date. That’s how to be more confident and successful in achieving your career goals.

Copyright 2013 Michelle Kerrigan

Michelle Kerrigan is an expert in workplace success who helps clients develop the practical skills they need to improve their confidence and performance. Michelle also writes and speaks on the impact self esteem has on success, and is currently producing and hosting a series for public TV, called Workplace Confidence. More at www.workplaceconfidence.com and www.michellekerriganinc.com

If you felt moved, inspired, touched, helped, annoyed, or anything after reading this, please let us know. Our wonderful bloggers really do appreciate your comments and feedback. It’s super easy and takes a minute. Click on comments below.

Posted by Michelle Kerrigan on June 26th, 2013 in Career, New Directions | No comments Read related posts in , , , , , , , ,

13 jun

The Evolved 3 C’s of Marketing [Infographic]

RobertCordrayIn order to better help your business to grow, you need to first attract an audience, then you’ll need to retain it. That’s where marketing comes into play. Showing that your business values it’s customers is a key component to making any company work.

So how do you attract an audience, retain it and show that you value your customers? In the graphic below, you’ll learn about the new and evolved 3 C’s of marketing. You’ll learn which factors of marketing will catch your customer’s attention, get them talking and make an impression.

Scroll down and you’ll see examples of things you can do, and how you can better focus your marketing efforts.

3 C's of Marketing

[Source: Namify.com — creating custom name tags and banners.]

If you felt moved, inspired, touched, helped, annoyed, or anything after reading this, please let us know. Our wonderful bloggers really do appreciate your comments and feedback. It’s super easy and takes a minute. Click on comments below.

Posted by Robert Cordray on June 13th, 2013 in Career | No comments

13 jun

Cigarettes – Out of Your Body, Out of Your Mind

JennaSmithQuitting smoking is not an easy thing to do for many people. No matter how much they know they need to quit or even how much they want to quit, the fact is, the addiction factors involved in quitting are hard to combat. Because smoking is both a physical and mental addiction, both of these aspects need to be addressed in order to break the addiction once and for all.

Old Habits Are Hard to Break

People become emotionally addicted to smoking. This includes the social aspect of it as well as just the fact — for smokers, it’s the first thing they reach for when they are upset or stressed out. Although contrary to the medical fact that engaging in smoking increases heart rate and other things associated with anxiety, there is no denying the psychological aspect of the “calm” the smoker receives upon inhalation. In a sad — and roundabout — way, cigarettes become a smokers “best friend”; one who is there when they need them, any time, any day.

How Do You Say Goodbye?

Replacing some of the habitual physical elements of smoking can help for a lot of people. Having something to hold or chew (or both) is an old stand-by means of facilitating the effort. These days you can try alternative means while working quitting with products like e-cigarettes from an electronic cigarette store. These devices have been incredibly helpful to many, especially on a psychological level. Having something to hold — and actually draw on can help ease the transition. The e-cigs with nicotine delivery capabilities also help ease a smoker down gradually.

How Do You Stop the Physical Cravings?

Chances are, you can’t. That doesn’t mean you cannot speed through them a little faster. Your body will go through withdrawals when you suddenly deprive it of the nicotine (and other deadly or harmful substances found in cigarettes) that it thought was essential to living. Most people that successfully quit will tell you these withdrawal symptoms can be terrible, but usually only last a couple of weeks or so. Unfortunately for a large number of people, that’s too long.

Getting the Gunk Out Quick

The body’s natural daily process is to eliminate waste and toxins. With the advances of medicine and understanding, we now have safe and effective ways to detoxify our bodies any time we want. You should always consult your physician before starting any kind detox program — in fact they will be able to help you choose the one that is safe and right for you, but a rapid detox may help increase a person’s chances for success.

Detoxification programs can help speed-up the removal of all of the chemicals that your body has has been storing and that you have become addicted to from smoking. If you can get these toxins out of your body safely, but faster, it makes sense that your physical withdrawal could potentially be over quicker.

Taking Care of You

Whatever methods you choose to quit, it is important that you take care of the whole you. Add a few healthy foods and beverages and omit a few unhealthy ones to your daily intake. Find supplements that specifically support purifying and strengthening the body. Surround yourself with people who will support you (unconditionally). Avoid stressful situations and the atmospheres that are prone to encourage smoking. And remember, you can quit smoking and start breathing easier. The first step, is up to you.

If you felt moved, inspired, touched, helped, annoyed, or anything after reading this, please let us know. Our wonderful bloggers really do appreciate your comments and feedback. It’s super easy and takes a minute. Click on comments below.


Posted by Jenna Smith on June 13th, 2013 in Health, Personal Stories | No comments

13 jun

Addiction Stages of Change

RobertCordrayChanging any behavior doesn’t happen overnight, and drug addiction is certainly no exception. On the road to change, people tend to go through several different stages, and the length of time spent in each of these stages varies for everyone.

The Stages of Change Model was first developed in the late 1970’s by James Prochaska and Carlo DiClemente at the University of Rhode Island. It describes five stages of readiness and provides a framework to better understand the change process. Success in recovery from addiction hinges upon interventions tailored to match a person’s readiness for change and their ability to effectively move through each of the five stages. Interventions that do not match the person’s readiness are more likely to damage rapport, create resistance and impede change.

The cognitive and behavioral stages of change are:

  1. Pre-Contemplative
  2. Contemplation
  3. Preparation
  4. Action
  5. Maintenance
  6. Relapse (not a part of change, but commonly occurs during the change process)

Pre-Contemplative

People in this stage are not aware of any need to change. Pressuring someone in this stage to seek help will likely push them further away, as they are generally not interested in any type of help and often become defensive when approached by any outside efforts or pressure to get them to quit. If you are trying to help a friend or family member become aware of their problem, start with a positive approach where you help them try to see the consequences of what they are doing. Take a self-inventory to assess whether anything you are doing is enabling the person to continue their behavior.

Contemplative

In this second stage of change, people begin to become more aware of the consequences of their behavior and wonder if they should deal with it. Often a person will feel quite ambivalent about this decision. Likely, the person may have experienced consequences of their behavior such as a DUI, problems at work or home or health concerns that have prompted them to weigh the pros and cons of their choices. When a person has entered this stage, try to reinforce the cons of continuing with drugs and the pros of sobriety.

Preparation

A person in this third stage of change may have made statements such as, “I’ve got to do something about this. I can’t go on living this way.” They are ready to research their options and find out what can help and how to make the life changes they desire. Taking time for research at this point is critical in the change process because it allows a person to learn about various methods or clinics and begin to accept all that will be required of them as they move towards cessation and recovery.

Action

At this fourth stage, a person has begun dealing with their addiction by fulfilling a treatment plan and doing things such as attending regular professional treatment or participating in AA meetings. A person in this stage needs the patience and support of those around them more than ever, as they will likely experience withdrawal symptoms and emotional effects from giving up the thing that has been most important to them up until this point. If you are in this stage, set short-term goals and seek continuous support.

Maintenance

In this fifth stage, a person has dealt with the initial challenges of change and should acquire skills and set new rules in their life to avoid relapse. It is important for people in this stage to remind themselves of how far they have come and how their change has impacted their own life as well as the lives around them. Continued support at this stage is just as important to help avoid relapse.

Relapse

Because relapse is so common among drug addicts, many professionals include relapse as a possible part of the stages of change. It is easy for a person in recovery to fall back into old ways because staying sober is a learning process. If someone has experienced relapse, remind them of their hard work and the positive changes they have made in their life.

Regardless of what stage of change a person is in, those suffering from addiction problems can seek help through different types of treatment or long term drug rehab to help them through their own personal process of change.

If you felt moved, inspired, touched, helped, annoyed, or anything after reading this, please let us know. Our wonderful bloggers really do appreciate your comments and feedback. It’s super easy and takes a minute. Click on comments below.

Posted by Robert Cordray on June 13th, 2013 in Uncategorized | No comments Read related posts in , , ,

06 jun

The Brilliance (and Fun) of Improv!

Kerrigan2I tried improvisational theater (improv) for the first time the other night on the upper west side of Manhattan, and I’m hooked.

At first, I felt a bit uncomfortable performing without any script or knowledge of where the story was going. But here’s the thing: No one did, and we were all in this together. You see, improv is created collaboratively, without any pre-planning.

The story just unfolds, and it’s amazing how new ideas begin to flow: the creativity, the cooperation, and the fun are exhilarating! And, it’s all wrapped around a sense of openness and saying “yes” right from the get-go and building from there.

This culture of “yes” frees you from fear and embarrassment, and too much reliance on boring, tried and true habits. The brilliance of improv is that it takes you places you never thought you’d go, and your teammates are along for the ride as you all leap into the unknown together.

Now, picture this culture of “yes” in today’s corporate life, where change is an everyday event and innovation and resilience are necessary for growth. Improvisers take risks and make mistakes, and that’s needed to go forward in new directions. Just picture replacing tension, fear and conflict with encouragement, new ideas, and high team engagement.

Improv can open doors to the unexpected, to seeing and doing things differently. It could be the breath of fresh air, fun and forward-thinking you and your organization need.

So, what are you waiting for? Jump in and say “yes”!

Copyright 2013 Michelle Kerrigan. All Rights Reserved.

Michelle Kerrigan is an expert consultant and coach who specializes in helping clients achieve workplace success by developing the practical skills they need to improve their confidence, performance and productivity. More at www.michellekerriganinc.com and www.workplaceconfidence.com.

If you felt moved, inspired, touched, helped, annoyed, or anything after reading this, please let us know. Our wonderful bloggers really do appreciate your comments and feedback. It’s super easy and takes a minute. Click on comments below.

Posted by Michelle Kerrigan on June 6th, 2013 in Career, Global/Social Change, New Directions | No comments Read related posts in , , , , , , , , , , ,