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The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Who's to Blame?

Who's to Blame?

Does this describe your guy? He helps with the diaper-changing, the feedings, the burping and you split getting up in the middle of the night. Grab hold tight—you have a great man as the father of your child.

Unfortunately, that picture-perfect image isn’t always accurate. It’s been said time and again that children who grow up with a sturdy father figure can do better in school and are more emotionally secure. Have you ever thought about why your main squeeze is not stepping up to bat? Part of the reason could be…you.

Hey, we’re not pointing fingers—and neither is psychology professor Sarah Shapee-Sullivan from Ohio State University, who conducted research on fathers’ involvement with babies and interviewed parents before and after giving birth. If you want to improve this special relationship in your family, listen up. Moms who encouraged interactions between dad and baby (pay a compliment, give an extra thank you, etc.) experienced more involved papas.

And what turned the guys off? Criticism. Be thankful that he’s helping out—don’t freak about how he dressed baby Susie. Unless it’s something terribly wrong, try to bring out the positive in each experience so dad doesn’t get scared away.

How do you get your baby’s father to be involved? [Voice of America]

Posted: 6/11/08