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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Breathe, Baby

It’s no secret that new moms are constantly in a state of concern over what is good for baby—the studies and research change constantly! Just when you thought you’d given your child all he or she needs to be healthy, another claim comes along to tell you that something else may be a danger.

Condsider today’s news in the Wall Street Journal that points to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a condition that hospitalizes 125,000 babies each year and is the cause of death in 500 per year. Drug companies are pushing an expensive treatment that they say can cut the risk for hospitalization in half. But does your child really need it?

The American Academy of Pediatrics does categorize children they deem to be at risk for RSV, such as preemies and children born with chronic lung disease, and does recommend use of the drug in those cases. But there is no indication that all kids need to be treated against RSV. The best way to keep your baby healthy? Do what you already know is right: wash hands frequently, limit contact with those who have colds, keep baby away from cigarette smoke and head to the pediatrician or ER if she isn't breathing properly or has a severe cold. And of course, breast-feeding has been shown to keep kids healthier in general. Do what you can, and don’t fret every little piece of news out there! Chances are, both you and your child will be perfectly fine. [Wall Street Journal]

Posted: 4/16/08