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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Dr. T. Berry Brazelton

Dr. T. Berry Brazelton

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Armin A. Brott

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Step it Up, Dads!

Step it Up, Dads!

You are probably familiar with the stereotypes of moms and dads.

Mom: comforts, changes diapers, fixes boo-boo and much, much more

Dad: tickles, kisses good night and gives high-fives

If you agree with this, WAKE UP! Parenting is no longer the domain of women; today, it’s a partnership and both of you should be equally involved in the life of your child. This approach is often referred to as “shared” or “equal” parenting. However, it isn’t that prevalent yet because moms are still doing five times more work feeding, cleaning and taking care of the kids than dads, according to the University of Wisconsin’s National Survey of Families and Households.

You don’t have to take over childrearing duties right away, but there are some small ways you can pitch in. Do what you and your child’s mother are comfortable with—if you get queasy when you see someone puking then try switching off for another task. Try making a spreadsheet chart to show when each parent will be “in charge.” Make sure to include other childcare, like grandparents or daycare in the mix. Don’t be upset if you don’t find an exact 50/50 balance…it’s just not possible for everyone, so aim as close as you can.

What would you say your percentage of helping out is? If you need to, what will you do to improve? [New York Times Magazine]

Posted: 6/12/08