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Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

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Our Being a New Dad Experts

Dr. T. Berry Brazelton

Dr. T. Berry Brazelton

Founder of the Child Development Unit at Children’s Hospital...

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Armin A. Brott

Armin A. Brott

Parenting expert, author, and weekly radio show host

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Dr. Jerrold Lee Shapiro

Dr. Jerrold Lee Shapiro

Clinical psychologist and professor of counseling psychology...

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News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Dads at Home

Chances are that growing up, your dad was the family breadwinner and your mom did most of the care and feeding of the kids (regardless of whether she worked all day as well). With U.S. census data suggesting that women will soon outnumber men in top professions—largely because they have had more education—the new generation of moms is being referred to as the American Matriarchy, with dads taking a more active role in taking care of the kids.

This shift, exciting as it is, also has some pitfalls. We can change the dynamic but it’s harder to change human nature. As a new dad, you’ve probably already faced times when your partner takes over childcare duties after work or wants to be the go-to parent because she feels more of a bond with the child she carried inside her. If you’re feeling left out as a dad, speak up! Let your partner know that you enjoy parenting your child, and talk through ways to share responsibilities that keep you both engaged with the kids. Also acknowledge your partner’s feelings—there is a great expectation for women who work to also be super-moms. Let her know she’s doing a great job, and remember that you are both there to support one another. [Journal Gazette]

Posted: 4/15/08