"Hurray!!! This is a wonderful site and I wish you the very, very, very best." -Nancy
Read More Testimonials»

On the Family Blog

Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care

For many young people, drug use and experimentation is a rite of passage of sorts. However, experimenting with drugs and alcohol is far from harmless, and can often result in lifelong...

Read More About Young Adults and Addiction: The Benefits of Inpatient Care»

Our Adopting a Pet Experts

Diana L. Guerrero

Diana L. Guerrero

Animal behaviorist and author of Blessing of the Animals...

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Dr. Robyn Jaynes

Dr. Robyn Jaynes

Pet care expert for PetSmart

Shared by First30Days View Profile»
Warren Eckstein

Warren Eckstein

Pet trainer and author of Pet Aerobics

Shared by First30Days View Profile»

Meet all of our Family Experts»

News

The latest news on this change — carefully culled from the world wide web by our change agents. They do the surfing, so you don't have to!

Dinner for Fido

Dinner for Fido

When your new pet is staring up at you at the dinner table, it is so hard to resist those pleading eyes. We have all heard how bad “people food” is for our pets, but could it be deadly?

Last year, more than 130,000 cases of animal poisoning were reported to the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center, and most occurrences were caused by human food and household items. An article listing the most toxic foods was recently posted on the Today Show web site, and included avocados, nuts, chocolate, beer, and raisins. Foods that were okay to occasionally treat your pet with were also listed, including pasta, vegetables, and lean meats. It should go without saying that they're probably talking about dogs, and maybe cats. We'd hate to see you try to feed lean meats to your fish or pasta to your snake (though we guess if you feel the need, that's your business.)

Additional information and complete lists of dangerous food and plants can be found on the ASPCA’s web site. Signs of pet poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, and redness of the skin, ears, and eyes. If you are worried that your pet may have been poisoned, call the Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435. A consultation fee may be applied.

Do you have any personal cautionary tales of people foods to avoid giving your pets?[Today]

Posted: 5/13/08